Gypsy Music: Rajasthan​ to Django

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There’s nothing more soulful than gypsy music. Be it a simple duet of voice and fiddle or the hurricane blast of a Balkan brass brand, the music of the world’s ultimate free spirits is intoxicating.

Moving westward out of Northern India more than millennium ago, the gypsies arrived in Eastern Europe in the 14th century. Over the next several hundred years, the Roma – as they refer to themselves – spread across Europe, West Asia and even to the Americas and were consistently exploited and used as labour but tolerated for the contributions to the arts, particularly as craftsmen, fortune tellers and musicians.

Despite a colourful history of nomadism, ingenuity and resilience, the Roma experience is one of suspicion, persecution and marginalisation. Tens of thousands of Roma are believed to have perished in Nazi death camps during the 1940s, and even today, most host countries continue to maintain a culture of discrimination against them.

Over the years, scholars have advanced a number of theories on their origins, linking them to cave-dwelling primitives and wandering Jews. But by the 18th century, similarities between the Romani and several South Asian languages suggested an Indian origin. And as the science of linguistics, genetics and comparative cultural studies developed, this theory has strengthened and today it is universally accepted.

In February, during the International Roma Conference and Cultural Festival in Delhi, Minister of External Affairs Sushma Swaraj referred to the gypsies as the “children of India”. Encouraged, the festival concluded with a call for the government of India to recognise the roughly 20-million-strong Roma community as part of the Indian diaspora.

While we wait for the government to consider that recommendation, let’s tune in to some truly spectacular music from this global community. [My latest article from SCROLL.IN here]

Everybody Must Get Stoned: Sunday Sounds

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The exact moment that India finally embraced Flower Power is captured forever in the hypnotic and groping guitar riff that opens the hippie anthem “Dum Maro Dum” in the film Hare Rama Hare Krishna (1971).

That this cultural milestone was designed by director and film lead Dev Anand to warn Indians about the loose, drug-addled lifestyle of hippies, rather than embrace it, is the very definition of irony.

“Dum Maro Dum” became an instant hit. Along with Asha Bhosle’s sultry vocals, the acrid smell of charas (hashish) seemed to seep out of radios all across North India. The composer, RD Burman, used the song as a platform to fly at the loftiest levels of popular music for the next 15 years. A young Zeenat Aman, on whom the song had been picturised, shot to “national sexpot” status overnight. Even Anand confessed he had fallen in love with his co-star.

The song remains one of Bollywood’s all-time favourites, as evergreen as eternal young man Dev Anand himself.

Over the years, as reputations of Bhosle and Pancham da (Burman) grew internationally, “Dum Maro Dum” became a source of inspiration for a slew of artists all over the world. [full article]

Sunday Best

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For several years now I have been privileged to write a weekly column for India’s premier online newspaper, Scroll.in. The column is called Sunday Sounds. I consider myself privileged for a couple of reasons:

  • I have been given a very wide and liberal brief. Essentially, I can write and share music of any genre, type, style or artist so long as it has some connection with South Asia.
  • As I’ve prepared for each week’s column I find myself researching and learning and discovering ever more about the incredible diversity and abundance of South Asian musical talent.
  • As a result of the column I’ve created a small following of fans many of whom are connected with the arts and culture communities of South Asia. In turn and through their good graces I’ve been able to begin other creative projects, such as writing books.

So to all the people at Scroll.in, especially its incredible editor Naresh Fernandes I say thank you.

There have been the more than 100 editions of Sunday Sounds thus far. To share my gratitude and joy I have put a small collection of just 25 tracks in a double ‘disc’ which I hope you will enjoy. If you’re already a fan of Sunday Sounds, you can look forward to more columns and fascinating music. If you’re a newbie, I hope you’ll log in to Scroll every Sunday and enjoy the stupendous and endlessly pleasing world of South Asian sangeet/musiqui.

This is diverse collection and reflects the Sunday Sounds mandate perfectly. You’ll discover South Indian rock fusion and fresh Pakistani qawwali. You’ll also find some English pop songs from the Beatles and Sam Roberts. Of course, there is quite a bit of South Asian folk music (one of my favourite genres), some ragas (both traditional and funked-up) and contributions from the South Asian diaspora in South and North America. In other words, quite a bit to keep a smile on your face for several hours!

Sunday sounds v1

Track Listing (pt. 1)

01 Panivizhum Malarvanam [Karthik and Bennet and Band]

02 Limbo Jazz [Wynton Marsalis and Sachal Ensemble]

03 Akhan cham cham wassiyan [Tina Sani]

04 NSA vs USA [Shahid Buttar]

05 Mustt Mustt [Brookly Qawwali Party]

06 Love, Love, Love [Shaukat Ali].

07 Sometimes I Feel Like A Motherless Child/ Mai Ni [Madeleine Peyroux and Sachal Ensemble]

08 Hai Sharmaon Kis Kis Ko Bataon [Tabla for Two]

09 People Power in the Disco Hour [Clinton]

10 Jokerman [Divana]

11 Light My Fire [Ananda Shankar]

12 Dear Prudence [The Beatles]

 

V1

Track Listing (pt.2)

13 Sialkot [Sunny Jain Collective]

14 Idhar Zindagi ka Janaaza Uthega [Attaluah Khan Niazi]

15 Taj Mahal [Sam Roberts]

16 Raag Megh [Zohaib Hassan Khan]

17 Charkha [Ustad Ameer Ali Khan]

18 Blues For Yusef [Lionel Pillay]

19 Soul Raga [Abbas Mehrpouya]

20 Api Sanasille [Wayo]

21 Raat ke sapna (Raatein Sapna) [Ramdew Chaitoe]

22 Hippie Hindustani [Bonnie Remedios]

23 Hello madam disco [Nahid Akhtar]

24 Sri Jimi [Prasanna]

25 Mere Ghar Aaja [Blind Boy Raju]

V2

Love 6 Ways

God is Love. Love is God. Love is. Love is All. All you Need is Love. Love is the Answer. Love will Find a Way.

Love is always in season and love, ultimately, is the source and purpose of music.

Go ahead and listen to these songs, each of which look at this basic human emotion from slightly different angles.article-psnegdllyv-1460628450

full article from Scroll.in here